5 reasons not to share that Common Core worksheet

Some more real talk about Common Core

But when we widely share the product of others' frustration online, we amplify the anger. Ultimately, classroom teachers are the targets of this anger, as they are the public face of the education system. As a group, teachers work very hard with limited resources. They are called upon to equalize the inequities our society creates, and to offer not just equal educational opportunities, but equal educational outcomes to all children.

I don't know if Common Core is the solution to the broader problems of the American education system. What I do know is Common Core and broader project of quantifying educational outcomes with standardized testing is driven by the education companies like Pearson:

Public education has always offered big contracts to for-profit companies in areas like construction and textbooks. But in the past two decades, an education-reform movement has swept the country, pushing for more standardized testing and accountability and for more alternatives to the traditional classroom—most of it supplied by private companies. The movement has been supported by business communities and non-profits like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and often takes a free market approach to public education. Reformers litter their arguments about education policy with corporate rhetoric and business-school buzzwords. They talk of the need for "efficiency," "innovation" and "assessment" in the classroom.

The mingling of business and education blurs the line between learning and profit-making. Some education reformers advocating for increased reliance on testing also lobby for the large testing companies. It's often difficult to tell if lawmakers stick with education policies because they're effective, or because they're attached to high-dollar contracts.

Note: I did consulting for Pearson's higher-ed lead generation group several years ago.